Interpretive Communities? (or Interpretative Communities?)


Which is the difference among interpretive communities as Roger Chartier uses in History of Reading, and practices communities (or communities of practice) as Castells and others use it? (they seem so close beyond the origin)

"Simply put, an interpretive community is a collectivity of people who share strategies for interpreting, using, and engaging in communication about a media text or technology."
Thomas Lindlof

Interpretive Communities: Beyond Mass Communication bt Bryan Murley (Originally written as a final paper for J702: Media Theory in the University of South Carolina School of Journalism and Mass Communication. (read this article!)

Interpretive Communities
Texts and the construction of meaning. Daniel Chandler
The reader and the text. R. P. Carrol


Introduction to Reader Response Theory and Hypertext

Author: Jessica Laccetti
Part I Published on: February 28, 2005
http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/postmodern_literature_criticism/114328
Part II Published on: April 1, 2005
http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/18818/115057
Part III Published on: May 1, 2005
http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/postmodern_literature_criticism/115059


There is Nothing Inside the Text, or, Why No One’s Heard of Wolfgang Iser

Published in Postmodern Sophistry: Stanley Fish and the Critical Enterprise, edited by Gary A. Olson and
Lynn Worsham (SUNY, 2004), pp. 11-26.
http://www.michaelberube.com/essays/pdf/fish.pdf

Articles


Interpretive Communities: Beyond Mass Communication By Brian Murley

Originally written as a final paper for J702: Media Theory in the University of South Carolina School of Journalism and Mass Communication

Lindlof TR 1988. Media audiences as interpretive communities, Anderson JA (ed), Communication Yearbook. Vol 11, Newbury Park: Sage.
Communication Yearbook. Yearbook, 11: 81-107.
Edition originally published: Newbury Park CA : Sage Publications c1977-., 1977.

The Active Pursuit of Active Viewers: Directions in Audience Research. Debra Clarke Trent University

Canadian Journal of Communication http://cjc-online.ca/
Abstract
This article reviews the contemporary shift to active audience research among European and other media scholars, following the influential work of those such as Ien Ang and David Morley. It proceeds to examine the comparatively underdeveloped state of Canadian research about media audiences, and the variety of incentives to develop such research here. The distance between academic and industry research in Canada is discussed, and possible explanations of the gap in our academic knowledge of Canadian audiences are offered. Finally, the article considers possible means to approach the meaningful study of the media reception process within Canadian households. In the end, it is argued that the work of Ang, Morley, and others offers fruitful prospects for the understanding of media interpretation here.

Community as interpretive community: Rethinking the journalist-source relationship Author(s): Dan Berkowitz, James V TerKeurst

Publication title: Journal of Communication. New York: Summer 1999. Vol. 49, Iss. 3; pg. 125, 12 pgs
Dan Berkowitz (PhD, Indiana University, 1988) is an associate professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Iowa. His research interests include sociology of news making. James V. TerKeurst (PhD, University of Iowa, 1999) is a lecturer at the University of Aberty, Scotland. His research interests include sociology of news making and visual communication.

This article reviews the contemporary shift to active audience research among European and other media scholars, following the influential work of those such as Ien Ang and David Morley. It proceeds to examine the comparatively underdeveloped state of Canadian research about media audiences, and the variety of incentives to develop such research here. The distance between academic and industry research in Canada is discussed, and possible explanations of the gap in our academic knowledge of Canadian audiences are offered. Finally, the article considers possible means to approach the meaningful study of the media reception process within Canadian households. In the end, it is argued that the work of Ang, Morley, and others offers fruitful prospects for the understanding of media interpretation here.

Carsten Jessen.The reception of computer games by children and the young

Interpretive communities http://www.carsten-jessen.dk/intercom.html

The Dialectic of TV Reception.The Audience's Structuring of TV Viewing Strategies

Guillermo Orozco-Gómez
Based on a double recognition that TV reception processes are not fully understood and that even critical audience studies continued to priviledge a dual rationality which separates the macro and micro social spheres, this essay proposes to analyze strategies for watching television as the main study object of television reception research. The argument shows reception processes to be the result of a series of mediations that occur dialectically between television, viewers, and social institutions. The processes are multidirectional, whereby the TV-viewers, their culture and history, enter into complex negotiations at both the normative and the pragmatic levels. This involves diverse modes of intraction with the TV-screen, its texts and other TV-viewers as well.

Cultura oral y lectura hipertextual. Una reflexión desde la comunicación Autor: Rolando Palacio.Universidad Diego Portales

rolando.palacios@udp.cl
Docente de la Facultad de Ciencias de la Comunicación e Información, Universidad Diego Portales, Santiago de Chile. Director del proyecto: Portal de la Cibercultura Latinoamericana, Ley de Donaciones Culturales, División de Cultura, Ministerio de Educación de Chile.
//http://www.cibersociedad.net/congreso/comms/g09palacios.htm////

La dicotomía, cultura popular vs. cultura de élite, no tiene sentido en una cultura mediatizada, esto es, en una sociedad esencialmente inmaterial. El proyecto de la modernidad ha tenido como propósito domesticar la cultura oral y la risa, sin embargo las prácticas culturales se resisten a su disciplinamiento. Este fenómeno de resistencia, negociación y dominación se observa tanto en las ciudades como en la cultura mediática. En el contexto de la recepción hipermedial se ponen en juego nuevas formas de interpretación semántica en las cuales participan la cultura nomádica, las comunidades virtuales, la lectura hipertextual y las comunidades interpretativas. Este conjunto de prácticas culturales corresponden a la cultura mundo en donde se ha producido una apropiación social de la técnica y se han abierto nuevas modalidades de sociabilidad postradicional.

You make the call: The co-creation of media through interaction in an interpretive community of "Giants' Fans" Christina S. Beck. School of Interpersonal Communication. Ohio University

Athens, OH 45701. Beck@ouvaxa.cats.ohiou.edu
www.cios.org EJC/REC Vol. 5, No. 1, 1995

Stemming from hermeneutic and ethnomethodological foundations, this paper presents the arguments that "members" of "interpretive communities" co-create those communities through their interaction and that "member" interaction provides a contextual frame through which intersubjective interpretations of media texts emerge. Through ethnography and conversation analysis, this paper details the interactional resources that facilitate the reflexive co-accomplishment of context and text by one specific interpretive community. In so doing, this paper provides an empirical answer to exactly how one interpretive community frames the interpretation of media texts by its members.

Toward a more interpretative communication research 'framework': television as a cultural system. An interpretation of Clifford Geertz. Jan Servaes & Rico Lie

"Recently the concept of 'interpretive community' has been introduced by Lindlof (1988) and others in the mass communication context. In our opinion, the concept of interpretive community is not just another way to reconceptualise the media audience. Nobody thinks of himself/herself as being part of an audience, there is no sense of belonging, but each one does think of him/herself as being a member of a community. The notion of interpretive community is therefore a reconceptualisation of community rather than of audience."

Anti-essentialism and reception studies. In defense of the text Arild Fetveit. University of Oslo

International Journal of Cultural Studies. SAGE Publications. Volume 4(2): 173–199

This article argues that the proliferation of reception studies, together with a radical undermining of the text, has been nourished by a misconceived anti-essentialism. The article warns against overrating the freedom of the reader and against thinking that it is more in line with antiessentialist notions to describe how texts and other objects are perceived, rather than describing their characteristics. Following a brief historical sketch of anti-essentialism and how it came to nurture a turn towards the reader, the article moves on to addressing an interchange between Umberto Eco and Richard Rorty on ‘interpretation and overinterpretation’. Rorty, in part, seems to hold on to the essentialist ontology that he claims to be fighting – a move that parallels that taken by some reception scholars. Stanley Fish formulates an anti-essentialist position, but in a way that invites further misconceptions. Once we get rid of the misconceived anti-essentialism, we can achieve a more balanced and productive relationship between reception studies and textual criticism.

Murdock, G. (2001) ‘Strange Solidarities: Interpretive Communities and Imagined (*)

Publics’ in J. Grisprud (ed.) Sociology and Aesthetics. Oslo: HoyskoleForlaget.

Zelizer, B. (1993) ‘Journalists as Interpretive Communities’ (*)

Critical Studies in Mass Communication 10(2): 219–37.

Holism, communion and conversion: integrating media consumption and production research David Deacon. Loughborough University, Leicestershire UK

Media, Culture & Society, 2003 SAGE Publications. Vol. 25: 209–231


Stanley Fish


Fish, S. (1980). Is there a text in this class? The authority of interpretive communities. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Stanley Fish Links from Martin Ryder University of Colorado at Denver School of Education.
http://carbon.cudenver.edu/~mryder/itc_data/postmodern.html#fish

Stanley Fish at The Johns Hopkins Guide

http://www.press.jhu.edu/books/hopkins_guide_to_literary_theory/stanley_fish.html

The Reader-Response Theory of Stanley Fish

A Brief History of Literary Theory III. By Chris Lang
http://www.xenos.org/essays/litthry4.htm

Richard Rorty

Richard Rorty Links from Martin Ryder University of Colorado at Denver School of Education.
http://carbon.cudenver.edu/~mryder/itc_data/postmodern.html#rorty

Beyond Interpretive Communities. Bibliographies and other resources


Literary Resources — Theory This page is part of the Literary Resources collection maintained by Jack Lynch of Rutgers – Newark
Literary Theory at Voice of the Shuttle


Eco, U. (1990). The limits of interpretation. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Active Interpretation. Reader-Oriented StudiesBibliography
http://www.aber.ac.uk/media/sections/display.php?subcat=Reader-Oriented+Studies&cat=Active+Interpretation

International Society for the Empirical Study of Literature and Media

A bibliography
http://www.arts.ualberta.ca/igel/

The Reader-Response

A bibliography
http://www.ualberta.ca/%7Edmiall/reading/Readbib.htm

De la gramática del texto al análisis crítico del discurso

Teun A. van Dijk, Universidad de Amsterdam
http://www.discourse-in-society.org/beliar-s.htm

A Bibliography of Literary Theory and Criticism / Bibliografía de teoría y crítica literaria

Compilada y editada por José Ángel García LandaProfesor Titular de Universidad, Área de Filología Inglesa
Facultad de Filosofía y Letras - Universidad de Zaragoza
http://www.unizar.es/departamentos/filologia_inglesa/garciala/bibliography.html?107?
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