Audiences Bibliography Articles, Reports, Research & News


Latests solec's del.icio.us audiences:

Media Literacy EU
"Media Literacy may be defined as the ability to access, analyse and evaluate the power of images, sounds and messages which we are now being confronted with on a daily basis and are an important part of our contemporary culture, as well as to communicate competently in media available on a personal basis. Media literacy relates to all media, including television and film, radio and recorded music, print media, the Internet and other new digital communication technologies."


The Advantages and Limitations of a Focus on Audience in Media Studies. Philip J Hanes. April, 2000
"A focus on audience is important in media studies. There have been many different theories on how audiences respond to and interact with the media. This shows clearly the complexities of focusing on the audience and the ways in which audiences can be visualised. By giving a focus on audience researchers are able to see the complex process of the construction of meaning made by the audience as a response to media text. No audience member will interpret the media message in the same way. This alerts uses of the various media to the ambiguity of meaning and the richness inherent in the medium, aspects that producers need to be aware of in the construction of their texts. The limitations of a focus on audience derive from the impossibility of investigating and measuring audiences and their responses. Existing methods of audience research are inappropriate, as they do not consider how the medium is being used and what the various responses are of audiences to the specific texts."

It seems that we do have to keep reviewing and discussing this issues...


The active audience and wrong turns in media studies. Rescuing media power. by David Miller and Greg Philo

This essay is extracted by the authors from their book Market killing. What the free market does and what social scientists can do about it. London: Longman, 2001.

"In the field of media and cultural studies many researchers have stopped looking for media effects. Instead, they have become obsessed by audience interpretations of "texts". On discovering that people have different views about the world, they mistakenly advance the thesis that texts have no fixed meanings and reject concepts such as media power and influence. In this essay, an extract from their recent book Market Killing. What the free market does and what social scientists can do about it (London: Longman, 2001), Greg Philo and David Miller criticise this work on audiences and cultural consumption which they think is poor in methods and conceptualisation." (read full essay)

References of this essay:
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